The benefits of a warm cup of tea

I was reading an article suggesting a warm beverage can makes us feel more relaxed and friendly. I found the correlation interesting! But herbal teas certainly have many health benefits, and we should enjoy them regularly. Today I brewed a pot of nettle leaf, gingko biloba, licorice, lemon grass, and rosemary. It is nice to cut a fresh sprig of rosemary, and some lemon grass leaves from my herbs patch for cooking and teas. Have you ever tried licorice root in a tea? Oh! It’s divine! I enjoy herbal teas without any sweetness, but licorice root adds a nice touch of sweetness, without making the tea sweet. Here are some health benefits of these amazing herbs:

Nettle leaf: anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, diuretic, lower blood pressure and blood sugar, anti-cancer and anti-viral. Nettle is also high in silica, an important mineral for healthy, beautiful and strong skin, hair and nails.

Gingko biloba: anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, improves blood circulation throughout the body and to the brain, promoting improved cognitive function, mood, and memory.

Licorice: anti-inflammatory, supports adrenal function and helps to reduce stress, boosts immune system, anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-cancer, soothes mucous membranes and protects against ulcers, expectorant, protects the liver, assists blood circulation and prevention of clots.

Lemon grass: helps to regulate blood glucose, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, anti-microbial, anti-diarrheal, and assists in the prevention of cancer.

Rosemary: antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, supports liver function, increases oestrogen metabolism, and cancer prevention.

 

References:

Braun, L & Cohen, M 2007, Herbs & natural supplements: an evidence-based guide vol.2, Elsevier, Marrickville.

Shah, G, Shri, R, Panchal, V, Sharma, N, Singh, B & Mann, A 2011, ‘Scientific basis for the therapeutic use of Cymbopogon citratus, stapf (Lemon grass)’, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 3–8, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217679/

University of Maryland Medical Center, ‘Licorice’, viewed 6 July http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/licorice >

Williams, L & Bargh, J 2008, ‘Experiencing Physical Warmth Promotes Interpersonal Warmth’. Science, vol. 322, no. 5901, pp. 606–607, < http://doi.org/10.1126/science.1162548 >

 

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